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Canadian photographer caught in poo-storm from giant sperm whale

Canadian photographer caught in poo-storm from giant sperm whale

This story relates to The Ocean can Help Meet the Climate Change Challenge, finds new Report Additional information: Download the report here:  The Ebook version is available here: https://cld.bz/LdEfcuu#12 Original Story http://www.cbc.ca/asithappens/2015/01/22/photos-canadian-photographer-caught-in-giant-whale-poo-storm/ It’s a poo-nado, a poo-nami, or just a poo-storm. Whatever you want to call it, it’s a rare underwater event that most people would do their best to…

Underwater Kelp Forests Mapped In New Citizen Science Project

Underwater Kelp Forests Mapped In New Citizen Science Project

Kelp forests grow along roughly 25 percent of the world’s coastlines and provide valuable habitat and nutrients for many types of aquatic life.

Handover of the Fresh and Salty report to Pak Heru (Head off REDD+ Indonesia)

Handover of the Fresh and Salty report to Pak Heru (Head off REDD+ Indonesia)

Wetlands have been the focus of conservation and restoration efforts for over a century, and governments, international actors (NGOs and academia) and local communities around the world are now increasingly engaging in wetland restoration or avoiding wetland degradation activities for climate change mitigation. Yet despite the rapidly growing attention on wetland activities for climate mitigation,…

Mangrove deforestation in Madagascar: What are the options?

Mangrove deforestation in Madagascar:  What are the options?

Original Article from voices.nationalgeographic.com Mangrove deforestation in Madagascar: What are the options?. The last time you heard from us at Blue Ventures, my colleague Garth Cripps was talking about shark fishing on Madagascar’s west coast.  Here Dr. Trevor Jones, our Blue Carbon Science guru, talks about his favorite coastal ecosystem, mangrove forests, and some of the ways…

Underestimating the ocean: new evidence from IUCN highlights the carbon-regulating capacity of the ocean

Underestimating the ocean: new evidence from IUCN highlights the carbon-regulating capacity of the ocean

Gland, Switzerland, 9 December 2014 – Protecting key carbon-absorbing areas of the ocean and conserving fish and krill stocks are critical for tackling climate change. This is one of the findings of a report released today by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) in which top marine scientists describe how atmospheric carbon is captured, stored and moves in the ocean.

Keep it Fresh or Salty: An introductory guide to financing wetland carbon programs and projects

Keep it Fresh or Salty: An introductory guide to financing wetland carbon programs and projects

Wetlands International, Conservation International and IUCN have together produced the publication Keep it Fresh or Salty: An introductory guide to financing wetland carbon programs and projects. The report provides guidance for program and project developers from, or working in, developing countries on the numerous funds and finance mechanisms that can provide carbon finance for wetland carbon conservation…

North American Blue Carbon Scoping Study

North American Blue Carbon Scoping Study

The Commission for Environmental Cooperation has published a report that examines the extent and carbon sequestration dynamics of blue carbon ecosystems in North America. The overlap of existing marine protected areas in North America with these coastal wetlands is explored in an effort to assess the current size of the blue carbon market in North America. Read…

The Role of Mangroves in Fisheries Enhancement

The Role of Mangroves in Fisheries Enhancement

Other than carbon services, mangroves also provide other ecosystem services, including fisheries. Some 210 million people live in low elevation areas within 10 km of mangroves and many of these directly benefit from mangrove-associated fisheries. Yet, these people are often unaware of the key role mangroves may play, especially if the associated fisheries are offshore….

Mangroves for coastal defence: Guidelines for coastal managers & policy makers

Mangroves for coastal defence: Guidelines for coastal managers & policy makers

A recent publication from Wetlands International and The Nature Conservancy deals with mangroves as a defense against waves, storms, tsunamis, erosion and sea level rise. Mangroves for coastal defence: Guidelines for coastal managers & policy makers by Wetlands International and The Nature Conservancy seeks to answer questions such as: Can mangroves reduce waves and storm surges? How will they…

Why whale poo matters – George Monbiot – the Guardian

Why whale poo matters – George Monbiot – the Guardian

I can hear you muttering already: he’s completely lost it this time. He’s written a 2,000-word article on whale poo. I admit that at first it might be hard to see the relevance to your life. But I hope that by the time you have finished this article you will have become as obsessed with marine faecal plumes as I am. What greater incentive could there be to read on?

In truth it’s not just about whale poo, though that’s an important component. It’s about the remarkable connectivity, on this small and spherical planet, of living processes. Nothing human beings do, and nothing that takes place in the natural world, occurs in isolation.

When I was a student, back in the days when mammoths roamed the earth, ecologists tended to believe that the character of living systems was largely determined by abiotic factors. This means influences such as local climate, geology or the availability of nutrients. But it now seems that this belief arose from the study of depleted ecosystems. The rules they derived now appear to have described not the world in its natural state, but the world of our creation. We now know that living systems which retain their large carnivores and large herbivores often behave in radically different ways from those which have lost them.

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